Pam DeCamp Photography: Blog https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog en-us (C) Pam DeCamp Photography pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:57:00 GMT Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:57:00 GMT https://www.pamdecamp.com/img/s/v-12/u398744380-o279285934-50.jpg Pam DeCamp Photography: Blog https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog 120 120 Image Enhancement https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Image-Enhancement Before On1 After On1

On1 10 was released in November. I have been an On1 user since about version 6.  I received a free version of Perfect Effects for attending a Kelby Photoshop Workshop. I thought it was odd they had another company promoting their products at the workshop, but I took the time to watch the demo during our lunch break.

What I found out was On1 can be used as a plug-in or as a stand alone software. I have used it both ways.  I make my adjustments in Lightroom then move my image over to On1 Effects to further process my image.

For me On1 is a very simple way to enhance my images using the filters they have built into the program.  I am able to layer and mask my images to bring out the details I want or to add in textures or other color enhancements to make my images stand out. And as an O1 user, I receive several preset packages throughout the year. Most of the time I create my own images, but I also try the others out.

My favorite adjustments in On1 Effects are the Amazing Detail Finder located under the sharpening tab and clarity under the tone enhancement tab.  I find that these two adjustments bring out details in my images that I may have not noticed.

Old Mill of Guilford, NC as shot Old Mill of Guilford, NC after On1 Effects

I use a Nikon D800E DSLR and shoot in RAW. The image above was taken with a Tamron 28 -75mm f/2.8 lens. My settings were ISO 320, f/11, 28mm, 1/160 sec. The light was behind me and it was about 4:00 in the afternoon. While I was happy with my original image I decided to work with it in On1 Effects.  I used the adjustments I mentioned above and then worked on the highlights and shadows. On1 works similar to Photoshop in that you can make adjustments in different layers and if you are not happy with the change you can always go back and change or delete the layer.  I also added a leather texture to the image which created a warm feel. When I photograph a landscape with an older structure, such as this grist mill, I prefer to age the photograph to give it character.

Original Image: the details of the brick are lost in the shadows On1 brought out the detail with the Amazing Detail Finder and shadow adjustments

The image on the left is what was captured out of the camera. On the right I used the On1 Effects to pull out the detail in the bricks and to give the image a more surreal look.  The time of day I captured my images made the reds pop. My settings were the same as in the images above. After I adjust in O1, it saves it back into my Lightroom catalog and I can

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This is a collection of bottles in a potting shed. I thought this made a nice grouping. I did not move anything, just photographed it “as is”. My settings were ISO 800, f/4.0, 1/125, at 38mm with a Tamron 28 – 300mm.  I like how the coarse detail in the wood was revealed using the Amazing Detail Finder. I also used a subtle HDR look in this image. I like photographs with lots of texture.

Many times On1 offers the On1 Effects module as a trial; that’s how I started. In the full suite they had enhance, portrait, resize, and B&W modules, too. I have used all of these at one time or another. What I like about On1 is it’s ease of use. I have produced several images with On1 that have been in exhibits, competitions, and have won awards.

Thanks for reading!  Photography provides infinite opportunities for learning!

 


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Just For Fun! On1 Photography aged photos Antiques Enhanced photography filters Grist Mill Nikon Nikon D800E North Carolina nostalgia old bottles Old Mill at Guilford North Carolina On1 10 On1 Effects Pam DeCamp Pam DeCamp Photography Photo Enhancement photography PhotoShop textures https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Image-Enhancement Thu, 17 Dec 2015 06:52:53 GMT
Fisheye Lens: Pros and Cons https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Fisheye-Lens-Pros-and-Cons-1 PDC_0940

Yorktown Beach captured with a fisheye lens; you can see the slight curve in the foreground from lens distortion

The 8mm Rokinon fisheye lens is a great lens to capture landscapes and to create surreal images. There are definite advantages and disadvantages to using a fisheye lens.  The photographer has to decide what adds to or takes away from the image.

Pros of using a fisheye:

 

Washington National Cathedral Portsmouth Floodwall Mural Portsmouth Floodwall Mural Portsmouth Floodwall Mural The motorcycle appears to be riding out of the mural

Using the fisheye to creatively “bend” the subject is a pro of this fine lens. The clarity throughout remains intact. It creates a snow globe effect when used close-up.

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When shooting with a fisheye lens it is possible to capture sweeping landscapes with a greater depth of field. The image quality and sharpness throughout the image is a definite pro.  The photographer can also create surreal images with a fisheye lens.

Getting low to the ground will provide for interesting foreground in the image.

Cons of using a fisheye:

While the pros listed above are very positive uses, they can turn into cons if you do not want your subject to bend or curve. Even in the best case scenario you may end up with a slight curve on the edges. When looking  through the viewfinder, move the camera up and down and watch for the bend.  The image can be exaggerated or will look fairly normal as the camera is moved.

Photoshop and Lightroom have excellent lens correction features; with practice, lens distortion can be corrected or enhanced depending on the final vision of the photographer.

Sunrise Crab Orchard Lake, Carbondale, Illinois Sunrise Crab Orchard Lake, Carbondale, Illinois Yorktown Beach

In the sunrise photos above you can see how the clouds curve, but the horizon is fairly level. It does make for a nice effect with the arching clouds.  In the photograph of the boat, the horizon is curved and the foreground is bubbled toward the viewer.  While this may not be a desirable outcome, the photographer has to decide if that is what the end result should be.

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The fisheye lens definitely has its place in the photographer’s bag and there are many creative uses for it.  Adding a slight curve to a photograph can enhance the image or provide an unwanted distraction to the viewer. It is up to the photographer to decide how to use the lens. If given the opportunity to try one; see what kind of images can be made!

Photography is a skill with infinite learning opportunities!

 


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Travel Arlington National Cemetery close-up photography Crab Orchard Lake fisheye lens Flood wall murals Illinois landscape photography landscapes Murals New River Gorge Nikon D800E Pam DeCamp Pam DeCamp Photography Portsmouth Ohio Rokinon 8mm Fisheye Southern Illinois Washington DC Washington National Cathedral wide angle lens Williamsburg Virginia Yorktown Virginia https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Fisheye-Lens-Pros-and-Cons-1 Tue, 15 Dec 2015 09:08:51 GMT
Photographing Americana: Signs and Structures of Our Past: Chapter 2 https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Photographing-Americana-Signs-and-Structures-of-Our-Past-Chapter-2-1 PDC_3158

Standard Oil Service Station, Vienna, Illinois

Having grown up in a small rural community, I remember an old castle gas station in the center of town. It is long gone and I so wish I had taken a photograph of it to preserve its heritage. Vienna, Illinois has a beautiful gem that has fallen victim to vandals and decay.

The station was built in 1930 by the Standard Oil Company. It is one of several that was built across the country to fit the space available. Many of these old stations have been converted into private residences and other businesses.  I spoke to a resident of Vienna and he said, “Many people have expressed interest in the building, but there it sits, decaying each day.”

My imagination wandered to the days of “full service” stations. I could visualize the service man rushing out to gas the car, clean the windscreen and “take a look under the hood!”

The torch has been chiseled away; and it appears the "Service" emblem has been tampered with as well The letters have been chiseled off of the crown

As you can see from the above photographs, the torch (in photographs of other stations, it was a beautiful gold and red torch) has been chiseled away. It also appears that someone has tried to removed the entire “service” emblem!  The lettering on the crown has also been removed leaving behind a skeleton of the past.

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Other views of the building show the decay that is occurring. It is just a matter of time this beautiful landmark will be a memory just as the castle in my hometown is a memory for me.

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I could only see inside the bay area; there were broken panes of glass that I could aim my camera through.  I read other articles lamenting the sadness people have for this wonderful icon on the corner of Routes 146 and 45. It is a shame that someone will not step up and take charge of the restoration. I’m sure the expense is a hinderance.  The red tiled roof, the yellow brick; a wonderful contrast of color!

Take the time to notice the images around you; pause and reflect on the past.


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Hometown Just For Fun! Nostalgia Travel abandoned architecture castle gas station gas station Illinois midwest Nikon D800E old building old buildings old gas stations Pam DeCamp Pam DeCamp Photography road trip small town Standard Oil Vienna Illinois https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Photographing-Americana-Signs-and-Structures-of-Our-Past-Chapter-2-1 Sat, 12 Dec 2015 06:20:19 GMT
Photographing Americana: Signs and Structures of Our Past Chapter 1 https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Photographing-Americana-Signs-and-Structures-of-Our-Past-Chapter-1-1 PDC_3148 PDC_3150 With the paint wearing away, it looks like a chocolate swirl!

 

When you take the roads less traveled there are gems to be found!

While driving through Carbondale, Illinois this sign caught my attention.  I stopped and took as many photographs as I could.

The sign says closed for the season, but according to research this Dairy Queen on 508 South Illinois Avenue is a busy place!  The building is the original structure that was built in 1951 by Jack Clover. According to a 2014 article in the Southern Illinoisan, the stand has been owned by Mark Waicukauski for over 25 years and was owned by his father before him. In the article, Waicukauski says, “That old sign’s been there since the beginning!”

While traveling across the country, take the time to look around you! The gems you uncover may be diamonds in the rough!


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Hometown Just For Fun! Nostalgia Summer Vacation Travel Americana Carbondale Dairy Queen ice cream Illinois Nikon D800E nostalgia old signs road trip signs small town Southern Illinois vintage https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/12/Photographing-Americana-Signs-and-Structures-of-Our-Past-Chapter-1-1 Fri, 11 Dec 2015 06:13:14 GMT
Williamsburg Winery: A Worthwhile Stop https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/11/Williamsburg-Winery-A-Worthwhile-Stop-1 Williamsburg Winery Vineyard

Williamsburg Winery Vineyard

When traveling to the Williamsburg, Virginia or even to the Virginia Beach area, you should add on a stop to the Williamsburg Winery.  Located on about 300 acres in the Williamsburg area, the driveway into the winery is surrounded by vineyards.  On the day of my visit it was a very cloudy and rainy day…a great day for an indoor activity such as wine tasting!

Walking around the gift shop it is difficult not to notice the assortment of awards their wines have received over the years.  There were ribbons, metals, and plaques adorning the rooms.  This was my first visit to the winery. Our tour guide poked fun at the group I was in because we all had “real” cameras with us!  No cell phone photographers in this group! We watched a video on the history of the winery and the wine making process. Our guide led the way into the very large banquet room just off the meeting area.

Wine on display in the gift shop

Wine on display in the gift shop

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Banquet hall at Williamsburg Winery

I was impressed with the size of the banquet hall and the winery itself.  Sometimes “local” wineries are much smaller and produce a product on a smaller scale.  Williamsburg definitely has a world class facility to produce a large volume of their product.

After leaving the banquet hall we made our way into the wine cellar where the wine is stored in oak, stainless steel, or concrete tanks/barrels.  Yes, concrete!  Our guide showed us an egg shaped fermentation tank that they have been using.  I can’t remember all of the details but I believe he said it gave the wine a more milder flavor. The oak barrels are used for about 3 batches before they lose their flavor and then those barrels are recycled for flower pots or decorative use.  Stainless steel is primarily used for the sweet wines.

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Wine aging area

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Barrels in the wine cellar

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The egg-shaped fermentation vat

We also went past the private tasting area.  I thought it looked very “secretive” like out of a spy movie.

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Private tasting area

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Spiral staircase leading to the private tasting area

We made our way to the tasting room.  The James River White was very good.  I do like their spiced wine, Settlers’ Spiced Wine for the holidays; heavy on cloves and cinnamon, it will great warmed up with apple cider for a mulled wine.  I also liked their sweet dessert wine, Petit Fleur.  They give us a taste of the private reserve red wine, Virginia Trianon Cabernet Franc; it was very smooth and a mild wine. I also came home with a bottle of the Virginia Claret; close to a merlot in flavor. I am looking forward to making my spiced wine this winter! It will make the house smell so good!

During the tasting, Matthew Meyer, the vice president and winemaker made a visit to the tasting room.  Our guide said Matthew travels a great deal and they call him the “traveling winemaker” because he travels around the country to different wineries.  He, too, has won many awards for his winemaking skills.

Our guide on the left; Winemaker Matthew Meyer on the right

Our guide on the left; Winemaker Matthew Meyer on the right

If you enjoy a great glass of wine, the Williamsburg Winery is a perfect stop…especially on a rainy day!

Vineyard at Williamsburg Winery

Vineyard at Williamsburg Winery


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Travel Wine Winery red wine vineyard Virginia white wine Williamsburg Virginia wine wine tasting wine tour winery https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/11/Williamsburg-Winery-A-Worthwhile-Stop-1 Fri, 13 Nov 2015 09:56:16 GMT
Veterans Day 2015 https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/11/Veterans-Day-2015 Veterans Day stirs many emotions for me.  My father’s funeral was on November 11, 2011…yes, 11/11/11 (dad would have enjoyed the numbers).  This fall I took a trip to our Nation’s Capital and have written a previous blog about visiting Arlington National Cemetery.  Arlington is the ultimate homage to our veterans.  Many towns have veteran memorials to honor their fallen soldiers.

My family has had strong representation in the military; US Army, US Navy, and US Air Force.  I have had friends in all branches of the military.  I have a great admiration for those who chose to serve in the armed forces.  I seriously considered joining the Air Force in 1982; I had graduated college and was having difficulty finding employment as a photographer and had decided to pursue nursing as a career.  My friend Cathy had enlisted in the US Army and asked me to join with her.  I told her if I was going to go into the armed forces it would be the Air Force.  I ended up going back to nursing school and made the choice to stay in Cincinnati.  Over the years, I thought about the Reserves, but my biggest hesitation was basic training.  I hate running!  I never could run; I would try and that reported runner’s “high” never happened for me.  Basic training scared me, I dislike confrontation, I dislike yelling…so I decided I had better stick with the things I was good at.

My father always attended the High School Veterans Day assembly. The final year I attended with him (2010) was very memorable for me and it was always emotional for him.  The playing of taps always brought tears to his eyes, that day was no different, I was glad I was with him.

While en route to Washington DC, there was structure in the distance at the Quantico exit. On the sign it said National Marine Corps Museum.  I was in the center lane and made my way to the exit.

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National Marine Corps Museum

The roof of the building is a striking image against the landscape. I was excited to walk through the doors to see what was inside.

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National Marine Corps Museum

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Marine Corps Emblem

Many times I found myself in tears while reading the information in the displays.  There were 2 instances I took serious pause.  The first was when I was reading about a dog who had been trained to detect IED’s and how he died while riding in a vehicle that struck an IED in the road.  His handler donated all of the dog’s belongings to the museum. It was very touching.  The dog had saved many lives during his service detecting the same device that took his life in an accident.

The second time I took pause was when I was reading about Afghanistan.  In 2011, there was heavy combat, I had to read it more closely. My cousin Andy was stationed to a unit in Afghanistan during that time.  It was a very emotional moment for me. I realized, then, how people are changed in combat. I have great respect for individuals who choose this life.

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View looking up

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Upwards!

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Soldiers observing the entry way

I marveled at the exhibits. What fascinated me was listening to people tell their “stories”.  One young man talked about a fellow soldier who had been injured in Afghanistan and how he was “somehow different” than what he was before the experience. One exhibit was a boat with the drop down at the end.  I heard older gentlemen talking about his experience in WWII.  He stood on the boat and recounted how an entire squadron was lost when the boat they were on landed on a sandbar and when when they stepped off in full gear they drowned.

My impression of the museum was if you are a soldier suffering from PTSD it would be a difficult journey though the museum.  The sound effects were realistic; the exhibits were graphic. The voices, the shells exploding, the visual stimulation of the exhibits put the visitor in the middle of the action.

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I enjoyed walking through the museum.  It transports you through time.  My favorite part was the firing range simulator.  For $5 you can fire a stripped down AK-47, that fires a laser simulated bullet at 300 yards.  I had to give it a try!  The high score that day was 95%; the big difference was no recoil; no kick. I held steady, I had one shot go outside of the center of the target…my score…85%.  I was thrilled!  I need to spend a little time on the firing range!

The museum was a stop worth taking.  In the almost 2 hours of time spent at the museum, I did not leave the first floor.  There was so much to see; all of the exhibits were a transport back in time. Over the years our country has been protected by young men and women who have barely adulthood.  They are given weapons and are trained to kill.  We do not always understand the physical battles.  The emotional battles these young men and women face and carry with them for the rest of their lives are at times terrifying. When I see someone in uniform, I take a moment to thank them for their service. Thank someone you know who has served our country.


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Military Museum Patriotic Travel military National Marine Corps Museum Quantico soldiers United States Marine Corps UNSMC Veterans Day war Washington DC https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/11/Veterans-Day-2015 Wed, 11 Nov 2015 17:47:33 GMT
Arlington National Cemetery: October 30, 2015 https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/11/Arlington-National-Cemetery-October-30-2015 Whenever I am in the Washington DC area I always pay a visit to Arlington National Cemetery.  For me, Arlington is a humbling experience.  Each marker represents an individual…son, daughter, father, brother, sister…who has fought for our country.  On the day I was there they were cleaning the headstones, no wonder it always looks pristine!  I watch people look and observe, it is a place of reverence.  There is a sense of respect and honor.  If you ever visit Washington DC put Arlington into your plans.

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Arlington National Cemetery


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Evenly spaced markers at Arlington National Cemetery

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Such a humbling feeling to see the numbers of individuals who have fought for our country

My friend Julie went on this trip with me and she had never been to Washington DC.  I promised to show her the highlights which included a stop at Arlington National Cemetery.  We arrived at approximately noon and we walked through the visitors center then out into the cemetery.  Our first stop was JFK’s place of rest.  I do remember when he was shot and watching the coverage on our old black and white television.  It was a sad feeling, although I was very young at the time it is a memory that has stayed with me for my entire life.  Then shortly after was Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King.

My first impression when I visited Arlington several years ago has not changed.  It is overwhelming to take it all in at once.  The only sounds heard at JFK’s grave were the clicks of cameras and the mechanical sound from the cell phones that imitate the sound of a shutter opening and closing.  We walked to Robert Kennedy’s grave.  When looking at JFK’s grave then going to Robert’s there is a stark contrast.  JFK’s resting place is more elaborate whereas Robert’s is very modest.  They both have walls with engravings of their famous speeches.  Robert’s site has a fountain, but it was not functioning while we were there.

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John F. Kennedy

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Robert Kennedy

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View of Washington DC from JFK’s grave

As we continued our walk to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, I noticed 3 canons at the foot of the staircase. I told Julie they must have something special going on because the canons are not a normal site at the cemetery.

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Canons at Arlington

I always go to see the changing of the guard.  It is a solemn event.  The young men who guard the tomb have dedicated their lives to this charge.  It takes much discipline to be a guard.  The honor that is bestowed and entrusted on those who serve their country in this capacity is more than what words can ever describe.

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The insignia for the guards at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers

The precision in which the guard walks his 21 steps and the “click” you hear, often sends chills through my body.  When the new guard comes into the hallowed ground he is inspected, head to toe, his rifle is checked, they walk in cadence with the guard who is watching the tomb.

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Standing guard

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The new guard undergoes his inspection for duty

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Preparation to take over the post

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The walk out to take his position

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Honoring our fallen

Just as the changing of the guard ceremony ended I heard fighter jets in the distance. I raised my camera and started clicking away. I saw the 3 jets flying overhead and I told Julie, “This is not a normal occurrence, I wonder what is going on?”  In just a few moments after the new guard took his post a canon was fired.  I knew then there was something else going on at the cemetery that was of high importance.  Moments later it was announced they were going to do a changing of the wreath ceremony.  Only one other time have I witnessed this.  I told Julie she was very fortunate that she was here to see this.

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Missing man fly-by to honor a fallen aviator; note the lead plane flying off top right

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Standing guard and preparing for the wreath ceremony

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Wreath ceremony; preparing to place the new wreath

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Playing of taps after the wreath ceremony

The canons continued to fire during the wreath ceremony.  We started down the hill and we chose to go the less traveled path to make our way back to the visitors center.  As we came around a turn I saw a hearse (we had seen one earlier in the day so we figured there was a funeral).  I also noticed two Marines standing at the entrance to the road.  There was a funeral.  We made our approach, and I saw numerous troops, an honor guard, and a band gathered in the distance.  My jaw dropped.  As many times as I have been to Arlington I had never witnessed a funeral. However, this was not an ordinary funeral because of the shear numbers of military present.  This explained the fly-over and the canons.  I stood quietly while they gave the 21 gun salute and the playing of taps.  The photojournalist in me was itching to take pictures and all the while kicking myself for not bringing my big lens that day.  I started taking a few photographs here and there to commemorate this moment.  The one thing that stood out for me was the red flag with 3 white stars.  My guess was a 3 Star General.  This was a big deal!

On the way out of Arlington I looked up the funeral schedule for the cemetery.  Unbeknownst to me I had witnessed the funeral of a historical figure in our military.  Frank E. Petersen, Jr. was the first African American Marine Aviator and the first African American Marine General to serve our country.  General Petersen died on August 28, 2015 in his home.  Petersen joined the military in 1952 and flew in over 350 combat missions in Korea and Vietnam.  He received the Purple Heart after his plane was shot down over the DMZ in Vietnam. In 1979 he was promoted to brigadier general; he earned his 2nd star in 1983 and his 3rd in 1986. He fought many barriers in his life and he was quoted as saying, “When someone says you can’t or shouldn’t do something, I go ahead and try it to see why the person didn’t want me to do it.”  The Marine Corps was the last branch to get a black general; Petersen said, “Just to be able to say you kicked down another door was a great sense of satisfaction.”

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To the left in the red is the Marine Corps Band; center are Marines paying homage at the funeral of General Frank E. Petersen, Jr

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3 stars on the flag signify a 3 star general

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The troops file out after the funeral

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Conclusion of the funeral

October 30, 2015 will always remain a special memory for me.  My dad had great respect for those who served and fought for our country.  He always was insistent that when I went to Washington DC I should go to Arlington and watch the changing of the guard. He would have enjoyed this visit so much if he could have been there.  I thought of him often that day. He always became emotional during taps.  I am so proud of our service men and women who dedicate their lives to serving our country.  They give of themselves to fight in battles that many of us do not understand.  God bless our troops and our country.  Protect and watch over all of our soldiers.

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Missing man fly-over


A few extra photographs from Arlington National Cemetery.

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Standing guard

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A salute as they exit the wreath ceremony

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The commander of the Honor Guard; note the symbol of his command on the lower left. He also has a Purple Heart Medal.



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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Cemetery Military Patriotic Travel US Marine Corps African American Aviator African American Marine African American Marine General Arlington National Cemetery Aviator Changing of the guard First African American Marine Aviator First African American Marine General General Frank E. Petersen John Fitzgerald Kennedy Missing man flyby missing man flyover Robert Kennedy Tomb of the Unknown Soldier US Military veteran Washington DC https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/11/Arlington-National-Cemetery-October-30-2015 Tue, 03 Nov 2015 10:26:01 GMT
Senior Photographs: Nelson https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/10/Senior-Photographs-Nelson I had the pleasure of photographing a friend of mine’s grandson.  I have known Nelson for almost 10 years; it is difficult to imagine him as a senior in high school.  To me he will always be the freckled face little boy who liked to ride bikes at the campground.  Nelson has always been a polite young man and I wish the best for him in the future!

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Nelson posing next to his truck.

Nelson is a sportsman. He enjoys archery, hunting, fishing, boating…you name it!  They chose the location for his senior photographs; a cabin in the woods!  It was about an hour drive from Chillicothe into Hocking County.  It was an ideal location for Nelson’s photographs.  It was on the cool side and the sun was out.  With the dense forest we had a little shadow play from time to time.  Occasionally I called upon my daughter to help with a reflector to help fill in the areas if the shadows were too strong.

Without the reflector.

Without the reflector.

With the reflector

With the reflector

My assistant using the reflector to brighten the scenes

My assistant using the reflector to brighten the scenes

You can see how the reflector fills in the shadows to help produce more even lighting on the subject.

As mentioned above, Nelson is an excellent marksman particularly in archery.  He has won many awards and is ranked high in his age group. He has enjoyed deer hunting since he was a young boy.

Nelson pictured with his first shotgun

Nelson pictured with his first shotgun

Nelson and his deer scull

Nelson and his deer scull

Taking aim!

Taking aim!

Nelson’s brother Logan and step brother Brandon joined Nelson for a few informal photographs too.

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Logan and Nelson

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Logan, Nelson, and Brandon

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Logan, Nelson, and Brandon

The road to the future is waiting!

The road to the future is waiting!


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Forestry Hunting Senior Picture Sports Travel Woods archery bow hunting deer forest Hocking County hunting marksman Nikon 85mm Nikon D800E path reflector Senior Photograph shotgun woods https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/10/Senior-Photographs-Nelson Thu, 22 Oct 2015 09:44:38 GMT
Portsmouth Murals: A Different Perspective https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/10/Portsmouth-Murals-A-Different-Perspective PDC_9623 PDC_9624A few evenings ago I took a walk along the Portsmouth Murals. I just purchased a fisheye lens and thought I would experiment with the lens distortion. I like the 3D quality of the lens; it also makes for a cool “snow globe” effect.  The shoe factory buildings stood out and appeared to be coming out of the wall! I stood against the mural with the motorcycle and moved the camera around to create just the right curve; the motorcycle looks like it is coming right off the wall!  I had always enjoyed looking at images taken with a fisheye lens, but never really thought about purchasing one myself.  I have played around with other images using the fisheye; it is definitely something to get used to and will work well on some subjects, but not necessarily on others.

I like the look of the mural images.  Cropping a fisheye image is best done unconstrained; meaning adjust the crop manually vs a fixed dimension.  Thank you for looking and I look forward to sharing more creative images in the near future!

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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Art Hometown Murals Paintings Travel fisheye lens Flood wall murals Nikon D800E Painting Portsmouth Portsmouth Ohio Robert Dafford Rokinon 8mm Fisheye https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/10/Portsmouth-Murals-A-Different-Perspective Tue, 20 Oct 2015 07:55:05 GMT
MidWest BunFest: It’s All About The Bunny! 2015 https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/10/MidWest-BunFest-It-s-All-About-The-Bunny-2015
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MidWest BunFest vendor area

One year ago my daughter adopted two bunnies, Smokey and Shadow.  They are both girl bunnies and had been purchased together.  The family who had them was having difficulty caring for them and were looking for a good home.  Libby had always wanted a bunny, so I thought, why not?  They go well with the rest of our menagerie!

A few months ago heard a squeal come out of the living room; “Mom, mom, I want to go to BunFest!”  Ok, what is BunFest?  The more we read about BunFest the more excited she became.  You can bring your bunnies; they have a spa; they can have a check-up; they can even get glamor shots!  Further research showed that BunFest was in its 5th year!  We must investigate this!

My idea of a “festival” or trade show is usually photography based.  When I enter the vendor area of a photography trade show, I get an adrenaline rush!  I assume rabbit people feel the same way about BunFest!  It was bustling with excitement and stories about how their bunnies were rescued and there was plenty of toys and bunny related trinkets to fill a shopping bag!

There were many rescue organizations represented at BunFest. They had catchy names; DARN (Dayton Area Rabbit Network) and EARS (Erie Area Rabbit Society).

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Erie Area Rabbit Society display

I did not realize there was such a need for rabbit shelters, but I guess rabbits are much like other pets; people purchase them (likely seasonally) and then realize they don’t just take care of themselves and decide to get rid of them.  Rabbits require a lot of care and attention. Our rabbits live in a hutch outside. The hutch requires regular cleaning, the rabbits need toys to keep from being bored, and they need plenty of food, water, and hay.  Indoor bunnies need supervision to keep from chewing on electrical cords (because rabbits love to chew) and other objects that could cause injury to them.  They need cared for, brushing and they require regular exercise.  They can succumb to stress and have a heart attack.  During cold weather we move our rabbits into the heated garage to keep them from freezing.

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I particularly liked her bunny shoes!

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I can’t remember this rabbit’s name, but they had Lucy, Desi, Ethel, and a cat named Fred! They had 4 bunnies with them.

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This is a therapy bunny from F5RS (Frisky Ferrets, Fuzzies & Feathered Friends Rescue and Sanctuary); if she has her hat on, she’s working! http://www.facebook.com/F5RS1

Rabbit people come from all walks of life.  They are passionate about their furry companions.

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Kaycee Jane of Clover Patch Sanctuary in Franklin, Tennesee

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I noticed people gathering a round one of the booths.  There was a vendor who made clothing for rabbits.  She said she made a pattern and picks out different materials for the clothing.  Her website is AnnieElleBunnies.etsy.com. I think they looked adorable!

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Fashionable rabbit attire!

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Dressing the bunny to show off her style!



I stood at one of the tables and watched Andrea Biggs of Breath of Life Illustrations (www.facebook.com/breathoflifeillustrations) sketch bunnies for the crowd.  She worked from photographs that were sent to her phone.  It took her only about 30 minutes to go from  the sketch to a full color rendition of the photograph of an individual’s beloved pet.

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Andrea begins her sketch.

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The rabbit’s features begin to take shape.

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Andrea fills in the colors and the details.

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She shows the finished print to the young customer.


The rabbits could go to the Chillaxazone to stretch their legs and relax and refresh.  There was plenty for a bunny to see and do while at BunFest!

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Curious as to what might be going on!

Bunnies, Bunnies, Everywhere!

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Our bunnies, Smokey and Shadow experience BunFest for the first time.  We borrowed a pet stroller from a friend of ours.  Having the stroller was very beneficial to transporting two bunnies around the event.  People would stop to pet them and talk about their bunnies.

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Shadow

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Smokey


BunFest 2015 is an exciting event for rabbit owners.  You can purchase products such as toys, hay, habitats, and treats!  You can go to sessions on how to care for your bunnies and there was even one on how your bunny communicates!  The event is very worth while if you are in the market for a rabbit. For more information, website for BunFest is http://www.midwestbunfest.org


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Animal Rescue Festival Human Nature Just For Fun! Pets @midwestbunfest @midwestbunfest2015 Annie Elle Bunnies Breath of Life Illustrations BunFest Bunnies Bunny Bunny Rescue DARN Dayton Area EARS Erie Area Rabbit Society F5RS Frisky Ferrets Fuzzies and feathered friends rescue and sanctuary Hay Midwest BunFest OxBow Rabbit Rabbit Network Rabbits https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/10/MidWest-BunFest-It-s-All-About-The-Bunny-2015 Sun, 04 Oct 2015 09:53:33 GMT
Visit to Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/6/Visit-to-Bonaventure-Cemetery-Savannah-Georgia-1 For me, cemeteries are fun to explore.  The older the cemetery the better.  As a photographer I look for stories to tell with pictures.  Cemeteries create an atmosphere all of their own.  One of my favorite places to go when I was in college was Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, Ohio.  When my professor, Father Tepe, suggested I go there to “create” I was shocked…that was until I walked through the gates and began exploring.  The grounds were immaculate, with ponds, bridges, swans, geese, and seasonal flowers…it just came together.  I recently went back to Spring Grove for a photo walk with my camera club.  It is still beautiful and a great place to create!

When I planned my trip to Savannah, Georgia, I had heard so much about Bonaventure Cemetery…from other photographers. “You must go there!”, “No trip to Savannah is complete without a visit to Bonaventure!”  Bonaventure was already on my “list” of places to visit while I was there.  A friend of mine asked me to visit Johnny Mercer’s resting place and photograph it for him.  Since I had planned to go there anyway, why not!

The history of Bonaventure (meaning Good Fortune) is well documented.  Originally it was plantation which included over 600 acres.  The land was acquired by John Mullryne and in 1764 he, his wife and daughter moved to the Bonaventure site along the St. Augustine Creek.  Mr. Mullryne was active in the Georgia political system. Bonaventure remained in the in the Mullryne family until 1864 when it was sold to Savannah hotel owner, Peter Wiltberger. A portion of the acreage was developed into the Evergreen Cemetery Company at Bonaventure for use as a public cemetery. The Bonaventure Historical Society is presently responsible for the protection, preservation, and restoration of 22 gave sites in Bonaventure Cemetery. The cemetery encompasses over 100 acres and is also a city park.

St. Augustine Creek adjacent to Bonaventure

St. Augustine Creek adjacent to Bonaventure

My friend Julie and I drove around and explored a few parks in Savannah; some were in questionable areas of town.  We had to retreat to the car once when we heard a woman yelling and cursing at someone not far from where we were.  We decided that Bonaventure might be a better destination and we were only a few blocks away.  I pulled into the lot and parked the car and went into the office to pick up maps and to find out any details that we might need to know.

When I walked into the office there were 4 women gathered behind a table that had the maps and brochures on it.  They were all dressed in various fashions of goth.  One had pink hair, one with green…the woman who waited on me had black hair, was wearing a black print long sleeved top belted over a short black print skirt, black tights, black shoes.  As I approached her I noticed she appeared older than the other girls, maybe mid to late 40’s. I thought she was dressed a little “young” for her age but her petite stature allowed her to carry it well.  The most striking feature of this woman was her eyes. They were a golden brown.  Remember, I’m at Bonaventure Cemetery, reported to be haunted…

Her first words to me were, “Who are you here to visit?”  I may have chuckled out loud, but then said, “I guess that is one way of looking at it; I’d never thought of that way before.”  She smiled back and said, “Yes, we want you to enjoy your visit and I can make suggestions on those you should visit while you are here.” I dropped a couple of dollars in the tip jar and that stirred a little excitement among the other girls in the room.  “Oh, she made a donation; give her maps and make sure you tell her about Gracie!”

As she spoke, the woman’s eyes would change to a bright gold in color and almost glow.  I turned to look at the lighting in the room thinking my eyes were playing tricks on me.  There was a window behind me so I thought, “Maybe if I move and create a shadow, her eyes will be less distracting.”  I tried to do that several times, casually, as she was telling me about the notables interned at Bonaventure, I could not get past the color of her eyes.  I kept looking closer, they did not appear to be contacts, but her natural eye color. I told her I’d be interested in the Mercer site for sure.  “Oh, you want the historical section!  There are so many to visit there, you will love it!”  The walls of the office were lined with posters of photographs and plot numbers and she pointed them out and gave their history in such detail, just like she was a family member.  She said, “If you get lost or can’t find someone, come back down here and I’ll take you.”

She proceeded to tell me about Little Gracie Watkins whose statue stands in a lone plot.  She died of pneumonia when she was six.  Her family was grief stricken and they ended up moving away. Her parents are buried elsewhere, so Little Gracie is all alone and is reported to appear at times where they used to live as well as in the cemetery.

Entry into Bonaventure Cemetery

Entry into Bonaventure Cemetery


Bonaventure Cemetery

Bonaventure Cemetery

I drove into the cemetery and the moss covered oak trees gave it an ambience that it is difficult to describe in words.  It was almost like you were being transported back in time. The historical section was definitely the right choice.  Most of the time I just walked up and down the pathways looking at the monuments and inscriptions.  Back in the 1800’s people were more poetic and it seems they romanticized death.  The sculptures and monuments were more ornate.  What was striking was the number of people buried in Bonaventure.  We marveled at the closeness of the graves and wondered how they could get so many in one plot?  Many of the graves had fresh flower arrangements on them.  There were other people walking around, but not as many as I would have expected.

Photographing Bonaventure is a difficult challenge.  Many of the photographs have been taken, especially at the more popular monuments.  Finding a new angle or a new perspective is not easy.  Sometimes just being able to document that you’ve been there is where the satisfaction lies.

Plot at Bonaventure

Plot at Bonaventure


One of my favorite statues in Bonaventure is one of a wife of Confederate soldier, Thomas Theus.  According to a search on Thomas Theus, he had requested when he died he be buried in Confederate Gray and named his own pall bears, all Confederate War Veterans.  Eliza Wilhelmina, his wife who preceded him in his death in 1895 is remembered in this monument.  The statue is very delicate and was lovingly carved. The curves and the lines are smooth. She is beautiful!

Note the delicate curves and detail.

Note the delicate curves and detail.


Civil War Soldier

Confederate Soldier’s wife at Bonaventure

I especially liked the curves in her hands. When you consider the time and detail the sculptors put into these works and the years they’ve withstood the weather, you cannot help but to admire works of art such as these. Plus they are available to view by the general public!  I looked at this statue and imagined what she was thinking about. Was she waiting for her husband to come back from war? The flowing dress, the wreath, her waves in her hair, the stones she is sitting on.  All of the detail and care placed in just one statue.

Close-up of the detail on this sculpture

Close-up of the detail on this sculpture

She must have been a very special lady to be memorialized in this way!


Up the road from Bonaventure was another cemetery, Forest Lawn Cemetery.  It still had character, but the newer monuments and fewer “family plots” gave it a more modern feel. The large moss covered oak trees gave it the “nostalgic” look, but the atmosphere at Forest Lawn was completely different.  At Bonaventure, I felt I had been transported back in time; the old worn marble monuments, the victorian style writing. At Forest Lawn many of the monuments had not received their lovely aged patina from the weather.

Large Oak Tree Forest Lawn Cemetery

Large Oak Tree Forest Lawn Memory Gardens


Forest Lawn Cemetery

Forest Lawn Cemetery

One monument at Forest Lawn caught my eye.  It was one of a girl holding a shell. When I arrived at Forest Lawn, I saw it from a distance and made my way to it.  When I approached there was a young man standing at the grave so I casually walked by standing and taking in my surroundings. Moments later he left and I decided to take a few photographs of the monument as it reminded me of one I saw at Bonaventure.  This girl was older, possibly a teen, where the other girl was much younger . The green moss on the statue punctuated the detail on the face and along the lines of the shell she was holding.  The sun was strong and as I found my way around (all angles), I decided to photograph it in a silhouette. The details the sculptors put into their art is amazing.  There is texture of the clothing, the hair, even the eyes have a “real” appearance to them.

When you compare the two statues (Bonaventure and Forest Lawn) you can see how the family/sculpture gained the inspiration for the one at Forest Lawn.  There are as many similarities as there are differences in the two. “The Girl with the Upturned Shell” is in the Baldwin Family plot at Bonaventure.  I spent much time walking around it, reading the inscription, and studying the detail in the statue.

Girl with shell at Forest Lawn Cemetery

Girl with shell at Forest Lawn Memory Gardens


Girl with shell at Forest Lawn Cemetery

Girl with shell at Forest Lawn Memory Gardens

Clearly this person was loved by her family.  The care in which the statue was crafted gives one a sense of great grief the family must have felt to lost this child.  A loss of a child is tragic.  Our children are supposed to out live us and move forward in life.  They have so much to look forward to.  The inscription on the monument is from Mark 10:15: Verily I say unto you whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child he shall not enter therein. Powerful words on this monument. Even though the monument is not mentioned in the brochure, there are plenty of photographs on the office wall of it.

Girl with shell at Bonaventure

Girl with the upturned shell in the Baldwin Family Plot at Bonaventure


Girl with shell at Bonaventure

Girl with the upturned shell at Bonaventure


Girl with shell at Bonaventure

Girl with the upturned shell at Bonaventure

I wish there was more information available on this monument.  The woman in the office made mention that I should see it…”go to the Baldwin Family Plot and see the girl with the shell, it’s lovely!”

Girl with shell at Bonaventure

Girl with upturned shell at Bonaventure


Mercer Family Plot

One of the notable individuals interred at Bonaventure is lyricist, Johnny Mercer.  I was asked before I embarked on this venture, “if there is time could you please take a few photographs of his grave?”  My friend knows far more about music and writers than I will ever know.  Yes, I’d heard of Johnny Mercer, but I had not really given it much thought to what works he had produced during his short life (he died at age 66 of a brain tumor). While in Savannah, I had seen Moon River, and had driven across the bridge, but it wasn’t until I saw his memorial bench did I make the connection that he had written it.  That was my “duh” moment for the trip!  Andy Williams made “Moon River” his signature song and that was the association I had prior to visiting the Mercer site.

Johnny Mercer family plot

Johnny Mercer family plot


Johnny Mercer family plot

Johnny Mercer family plot

Upon viewing his memorial bench, I realized he had penned many of the lyrics to songs I was familiar with.  How many times have we heard “Hooray for Hollywood”, “Jeepers Creepers”, “You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby”, “That Old Black Magic”, and the list goes on!

Mercer married a show girl named, Ginger Meehan.  They adopted a daughter named Amanda.  When Mercer became ill, he developed a friendship with Barry Manilow. Mercer was quite fond of Manilow’s song “Mandy” because it reminded him of his daughter Amanda. After his death in 1976, Mercer’s wife gave Manilow some of her husband’s unfinished lyrics. In 1984, Manilow had a top 10 Adult Contemporary hit with “When October Goes”; it has since been recorded by notables like Rosemary Clooney and Nancy Wilson.

Mercer received 18 Academy Award Nominations and won 4 for his lyrics for the following songs: “On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe” (The Harvey Girls), “In the Cool, Cool, Cool, of the Evening” (Here Comes the Groom), “Moon River” (Breakfast at Tiffany’s), and “Days of Wine and Roses” (Days of Wine and Roses).

Johnny Mercer memorial bench

Johnny Mercer memorial bench

The caricature on his memorial bench is said to be a self portrait.  I spent time documenting the site for my friend. While editing the photographs I noticed a few details I had missed or just plain over-looked while at the grave site. While at the cemetery, I had noticed on Mercer’s grave marker that there was an inscription: “And the Angles Sing”.  I contacted my friend and he confirmed for me that was one of Mercer’s earlier songs.  After I made it home from my trip I caught a glance at another inscription, “Momma Done Tol’ Me” (on his mother’s marker), then I started zooming in on the markers and on each of them were song titles…Why did I not see this before? On Mercer’s wife’s marker is “You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby”.  His niece is buried there (died 2013), her marker has “Skylark Won’t You Lead Me There”.  The other two I saw were, “Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day” and “Dream when the day is thru”.  All very touching and appropriate.

Johnny Mercer and his wife

Johnny Mercer and his wife’s plot

I was curious about the song “And the Angles Sing” so I looked up the lyrics:

We meet, and the angels sing.
The angels sing the sweetest song I ever heard.
You speak, and the angels sing.
Or am I breathing music into every word?
Suddenly, the setting is strange.
I can see water and Moonlight beaming.
Silver waves that break on some undiscovered shore
Suddenly, I see it all change.
Long winter nights with the candles gleaming.
Through it all your face that I adore.
You smile, and the angels sing.
And though it’s just a gentle murmur at the start.
We kiss, and the angels sing.
And leave their music ringing in my heart!

What red-blooded woman would not want to hear these words?  To me, the words are simply poetic.  That was Mercer’s trademark, simplicity. All accounts indicate what he did, he did with such ease.  The beauty of his words left a permanent  inscription on our history of music.

Johnny Mercer family plot

Johnny Mercer family plot


Little Gracie Watkins

My final entry is about Little Gracie Watkins.  Gracie’s burial site is possibly one of the most visited sites in Bonaventure.  Gracie died of pneumonia when she was 6 years old.  Her family had been hired as caretakers of the Pulaski Hotel, one of Savannah’s pre-eminent lodging facilities of its day.  Gracie was reported to have been the self-designated entertainment hostess of the establishment.  She would sing and dance in the lobby for the guests and soon became a “public figure” at the the Pulaski.

After Gracie’s death, her parents, as well as guests at the Pulaski became heartbroken.  Her parents had a photograph that was taken before her death.  She was wearing her Easter best.  They asked John Walz, one of Savannah’s finest sculptors of his time to create her image for her grave.  The sculpture is said to be life-size and has every detail of the dress she wore in the photograph. She sits gracefully next to a tree stump. Her look is pleasant and she has a rose in her hand.  Her eyes have a sullen appearance. I was very moved by the signs of affection visitors left at her grave; little trinkets, coins, etc.  Over the years the cemetery had to erect a fence to protect the monument.  There are rumors of people hearing her laugh, cry, and other unusual activities occurring both Bonaventure and at the former Pulaski Hotel site.

Little Gracie Watkins

Little Gracie Watkins

How do you feel about ghosts and spirits roaming around?  I have mixed feelings, but I do think there are happenings that cannot be explained with simple science or maybe our minds like to play tricks on our eyes.  Gracie is intriguing because after her death her family left and never came back.  She is buried here alone and her parents are buried elsewhere in New England.

The lady in the office shared a story with me that the local children would often come to Gracie’s statue before tests at school and rub her nose for luck.  I thought, I need to go to the side and take a profile picture of the statue to show the wear on her nose.  I leaned into the fence and focused.  I pressed the shutter button on my D800E camera and an odd noise came out of the camera, kind of metallic “click”.  The image was black.  I tried again…same results.  I looked at the statue and said, “Gracie, are you messing with me?”  I then looked at my friend Julie and told her, “My camera is not working”.  She just laughed.  I said, “Seriously, it isn’t working, look!”  I carried my camera out to her and showed her what it was doing.  I tried several troubleshooting attempts and it just wouldn’t work.  Fortunately I had my D700 with me as a back-up “just in case”.

Gracie Watkins Profile

Gracie Watkins Profile; notice how her nose has been rubbed down.

I put my lens on the D700 and walked over to the fence and said, “Ok Gracie, I am going to take this picture.” I took one and figured I shouldn’t tempt fate any longer.  It was getting ready to storm anyway, so I figured it be best to move along.

No cemetery visit is complete without a storm brewing!

No cemetery visit is complete without a storm brewing!

To conclude my “Gracie” story, when I arrived back to my camper, I took my camera out and began checking the settings and giving it a look over.  I depressed the shutter button a couple of times and it began working again…just like normal, and has worked without a flaw since. Was Gracie really being mischievous or did I just have a coincidental malfunction while I was there?  We may never know the answer to that question…


Here are a few additional images from my visit to Bonaventure Cemetery. Enjoy!

Iron gate

Iron gate


Fascinating with the star on it

Fascinating with the star on it’s head; note the green patina on the statue. it adds to its beauty!


Urn monument at Bonaventure

Urn monument at Bonaventure


Urn monument

Urn monument


Arch monument at Bonaventure

Arch monument at Bonaventure


Patriotic flowers adorn graves at Bonaventure. This is the only image I could get with the wind blowing. It was still the rest of the time there.

Patriotic flowers adorn graves at Bonaventure. This is the only image I could get with the wind blowing. It was still the rest of the time there.



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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Bonaventure Cemetery Hauntings Savannah Savannah Georgia Travel Baldwin Family Plot Barry Manilow Bonaventure Cemetery Civil War Confederate Forest Lawn Memory Gardens Ghosts Gracie statue Gracie Watkins Haunted Johnny Mercer Little Gracie Watkins Monuments Statues Thomas Theus https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/6/Visit-to-Bonaventure-Cemetery-Savannah-Georgia-1 Sat, 20 Jun 2015 08:51:26 GMT
Creative Trip to Ossabaw Island, Georgia https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/6/Creative-Trip-to-Ossabaw-Island-Georgia My friend Julie Thayer and I decided to take a road trip to Savannah, Georgia.  Since we are both a little short on funds we decided to pull my little Towlight camper and stay at the KOA in Richmond Hill, Georgia.  During the short planning stage of our trip I discovered a small island not far from where we were staying called Ossabaw Island.

Ossabaw Island is the 3rd largest barrier island along the state of Georgia.  It has over 26,000 acres of land, beach, and marshland. Dr. Henry Norton Torrey purchased the island in 1924 and built a home there.  The home was a 20,000 square foot Spanish revival house. The family was from Michigan and would winter in Savannah.  When daughter Eleanor (Sandy) was 10, the family’s home burned and they moved to Ossabaw Island.

Sandy and her husband Clifford West established the Ossabaw Foundation in 1961, operating the Ossabaw Island Project and Genesis Project as well as funding scientific research, public use, and educational programming on Ossabaw.

In 1965 Sandy learned about several donkeys needing adoption from a former breeder in South Carolina so she had them brought to the island as pets for her children.  The descendants of those donkeys still inhabit the island.  In 1978, Sandy sold the island to the state of Georgia due to the tax burden of the rising property value of the island. The sale stipulated that Ossabaw Island be declared Georgia’s first heritage preserve–set aside in perpetuity for scientific, educational, and cultural uses only.  Sandy at the age of 102 still lives on Ossabaw Island.

Opportunities to explore an island like this are rare.  The foundation offers few tours and workshops each year.  I was happy to discover that they were offering a tour while we were in the area.  The tour was an educational tour; it was posted as a “creative trip” to Ossabaw.  Many of the passengers on the tour were painters, writers, photographers, and historians.  It was nice to be among those who were there to absorb the beauty and the mystery of the island.

We departed Delegal Marina at the Landings around 9:45 a.m.  Our Captain was Mike Neal of Bull River Cruises.  He, too, was very knowledgable in the history of Ossabaw Island.

The Landings Marina

As we left the marina we drove through the marshlands and along side of the boat we saw dolphins, and a variety of birds.

Waterway out to Ossabaw

Waterway out to Ossabaw

The highlight of the trip out to Ossabaw Island was seeing a momma Osprey and her babies.  In the photograph below you can see only one, but on our return trip we saw 3 babies in the nest.

Momma Osprey and baby

Momma Osprey and baby

A loon surveys his surroundings.

A loon checking out the area

A loon checking out the area

Buoy

Buoy

Out for a ride

Out for a ride

During the ride out to Ossabaw Island, all on board gravitated to the boats railings to capture the image of the dark cloud hanging over this barrier island as we passed.  Many on board commented, “I’m loving this cloud” or “Isn’t that an awesome cloud”.  I’m sure it will be written into a book somewhere or painted into scene on canvas.

A dark cloud.

A dark cloud.

As we progressed, I kept seeing this massive boat in the distance.  It looked like it had wings.  I knew it was too big to be a sailboat (although a schooner came to mind).  As we traveled closer to it, I realized those were nets hanging off of the masts.  It was a large shrimp boat. Captain Mike explained there are not that many shrimp boats any more.  I was very interested in this image…I kept looking at the name of the boat; if it had been Jenny I would have laughed out loud!

Shrimp boat from a distance

Shrimp boat from a distance

As we moved closer to the boat, you could see the hundreds of birds (seagulls, pelicans, and other water birds) flying around the boat vying for position to be ready for “today’s catch” to be cleaned and the “extras” tossed overboard.

Shrimp boat

Shrimp boat

Shrimp boat

Shrimp boat

The birds were lined up on every available space of the shrimp boat.

Birds on a wire!

Birds on a wire!

Pelicans waiting for a treat

Pelicans waiting for a treat

Shrimp boat

Shrimp boat

Shrimp boat

Shrimp boat

Bradley Beach was to be our first destination on Ossabaw Island.  The lush green tropical trees and the high sand dunes were very inviting.  I would have loved to have stayed on the beach longer than 30 minutes though.  The beauty of that area was breathtaking!  The palm trees, sand, driftwood, gave the beach its own character.  The contrast of the colors and the textures were amazing!

A view of the dunes on Bradley Beach

A view of the dunes on Bradley Beach

A boat in the waterway outside of Ossabaw Island.

Boat out on the bay

Boat out on the bay

The large oak tree on Bradley Beach is used for research of the erosion on Ossabaw Island.  It is rapidly eroding. Each year the tree gets closer to the water.

A view of Bradley Beach

A view of Bradley Beach

If Ossabaw Island is “private” what are people doing on the beach?  Robin Gunn of the Ossabaw Foundation explained to us that the laws in the state of Georgia say that all beach front areas are public access.  As long as an individual can transport themselves to and from the island between daylight and dusk they are welcome to use the facilities.

Beach lovers!

Beach lovers!

Look closely…there is a little boy in the oak tree!  See how little everyone looks standing next to it?  Such a beautiful tree!

The mighty oak!

The mighty oak!

The young lady below was on a surf fishing trip.  She managed to land a skate.  She said that was enough for one day; she was going to enjoy the sun!

Surf fishing at Ossabaw

Surf fishing at Ossabaw

I met a charmin lady named Iris.  Her husband is the tall man in the blue shirt.  We were talking about photography and she said she just became interested in it.  We talked about camera clubs and I told her I was the president of the club in Huntington, West Virginia.  Her face lit-up and and she said she was from Winfield, West Virginia and her husband was from a town close to Wheeling on the Ohio side!  We walked and talked for several minutes.  They live in Savannah and this was their first trip to the island.

Iris and Mike posing for a picture

Iris and Mike posing for a picture

The lady standing on the sand dune has a magnificent tattoo on her shoulder…it is of an accordion style camera…it was wonderful! You can see how high the sand dunes are on Ossabaw.

On top of the dunes on Bradley Beach, Ossabaw Island

On top of the dunes on Bradley Beach, Ossabaw Island

The driftwood was beautiful.  These tree roots had great texture.  To photograph them was challenging because they had a sheen to them.

Drift wood roots on Bradley Beach

Drift wood roots on Bradley Beach

Along the beach at Ossabaw

Along the beach at Ossabaw

I decided to climb up on the dunes to get a better view of my surroundings.  I loved this tropical scene!

Tropical scene

Tropical scene

Another view of the oak tree.

Large oak tree on the Ossabaw beach

Large oak tree on the Ossabaw beach

Captain Mike captured a horseshoe crab (they were close to the surface and would pop up out of the water as the waves came in) and showed us what they looked like.  We saw several dead ones on the beach and he said they come in with the tide and often times they do not make it back out and die.  The horseshoe crab is used often in medical research; especially in research involving the human eye. There are no edible parts to a horseshoe crab.

Captain Mike Neal explains the benefits of the horseshoe crab.

Captain Mike Neal explains the benefits of the horseshoe crab.

A view of Sandy’s 20,000 square foot Spanish Revival home is not easy.  It is gated on the island and with the lush growth of trees you can only get a glimpse of it’s span from the water.  The home was built in 1924 and at the time contained the largest plate glass window in the United States. You can barely see it behind a large oak tree on the left. Her family were heirs to the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company. It is the original window. Sandy, at 102, still resides in this home.  It is reportedly in poor repair, but having read quotes by Sandy, she is happy on the island she grew up on and will not leave.  The tour guides shared a quote by Sandy, “I will not pass away; I will die”.  Sandy has a staff of caretakers who see to her needs and provides repairs to her home.  They have been the same family of caregivers for a couple of generations.  They, too, live on the island.

Eleanor Torrey-West estate.

Eleanor Torrey-West estate.

The boat dock at Ossabaw

The boat dock at Ossabaw

After we docked we met at the historical marker on the island.  Robin went over the history of the island.  As for other residents of the island there are staff of the Department of Natural Resources who live there as well.  We were given our boundaries and the trails we could walk.

Our group for the Creative Tour to Ossabaw

Our group for the Creative Tour to Ossabaw

The clubhouse was our meeting place for the day.  We could stow our coolers and other gear while exploring and being “inspired”.  The clubhouse is used for workshops for those spending overnights on the island for research and scientific study.  There are two bunk rooms upstairs and a kitchen, dining room, and living room downstairs.  It would be interesting to participate in a workshop or study.  They have an archeological dig going on as well.  After a long day hiking, it was nice to come and cool off on the porch in a rocker.

Ossabaw club house

Ossabaw club house

When we arrived we had about 30 minutes so we all broke out our lunches.  The donkeys must have a keen sense of smell because we were not even taking our first bites and they rounded the corner of the clubhouse!  We were told not to encourage them, they are like really big dogs.  I was taken in with how close these creatures came to us and how “patient” they were.  A few of the group shared their lunches with them.  I’m used to big dogs and have the strength to ignore them, so they did not get any of my food.  They sure tried to put Dr. Presley on a guilt trip though.  They double teamed him!

Domesticated donkeys

Domesticated donkeys

Domesticated donkeys joining the tour for lunch.

Domesticated donkeys joining the tour for lunch.

Keep a close watch on your food.

Keep a close watch on your food.

Pleaaassse.....share?

Pleaaassse…..share?

Captain Mike was trying to photograph them and they kept moving around. Instead they received attention and a nice pat on the heads.  Mike did his best to keep the donkeys away from us while we ate. You could tell that he, too, has a great love of the island.  He knew much about the wildlife, life on the island, and the history of Ossabaw.  If you are in Savannah, take one of his tours.  He is at Bull River Cruises.

Attempting to photograph the donkeys.

Attempting to photograph the donkeys.

Captain Mike Neal pays attention to the donkeys

Captain Mike Neal pays attention to the donkeys

Domesticated donkey begging

Domesticated donkey begging

While Robin was giving us a lecture on the history of the indigo crop on Ossabaw, I heard a rustle in the palms; it was more like a rumble!  I made my way around to the back side and one of the donkeys was hiding in the palm tree.  A few minutes later it made its escape by charging out during the lecture.  We decided he did not want to learn about indigo!

Donkey in the palms

Donkey in the palms

Indigo is a plant that is harvested to make the blue indigo dye for clothing.  It takes several thousands of bushels to make an indigo ingot. The process is very labor intensive.  From what I understood, the workers would have to fight the biting flies and withstand the high temperatures while working the vats. The longevity of the workers was short due to disease and fatigue.  In the early days of the textile markets the bidding for Ossabaw indigo was high. It was reported to be the best indigo produced in the United States at the time. The indigo crop died out on Ossabaw.  A few years ago, researchers found indigo growing wild on the island.  They were able to genotype it and discovered it was a mutation from the same indigo that originally grew there. They are trying to grow the indigo on the island again.

Robin Gunn discusses indigo processing.

Robin Gunn discusses indigo processing.

One of the historical landmarks of Ossabaw is the presence of tabby shacks.  I had no idea what tabby was until I arrived on the island.  Tabby is an “ancient” form of cement.  It took several attempts for historians to reproduce tabby so it looked like the original.  Tabby is equal amounts of oyster shell, water, and sand.  All have to be void of salt. This is a barrier island and those items have to be void of salt?  The tabby shacks on the island dated back to the 1700’s and at the end of the island there is a shell midden that supposedly was started by the Native Americans who inhabited the island.  The shell midden had been there for hundreds of years so the shells were void of salt.  The sand was acquired from different areas of the island and then the water had to be processed to rid it of the salt.  There are different tributaries that come in to the waterway we traveled.  The waterway is fed by rivers and the ocean. I attempted to go view the shell midden, but the walk became too strenuous and with the heat and ticks everywhere we became discouraged.  One group ahead of us said the pathway became covered in water and they turned back as well.  I realized we were there during high tide so that explained the water.

Captain Mike Neal of Bull river Cruises discusses tabby making.

Captain Mike Neal of Bull River Cruises discusses tabby making.

Looking inside the tabby shack you could see the primitive living arrangements.  At times some of the walls were discolored in the shapes of previously present doors or windows.  Each resident would restructure their “home” to suit their needs. The tabby shacks were built as duplex structures, meaning two families resided in the building.  There was a fireplace in the middle, often shared by both families for cooking and heating.  Dr. Presley told us about a group that had visited Ossabaw a few years back on a “reunion” tour.  He said in the middle of the tabby presentation the group moved into a different room and were saying things like, “this is where I slept” or “here was my brother’s bed”.  He said the entire tour grew quiet as they listened to the group reminiscing about their lives on Ossabaw.  He said during a historical interview the people who lived in the tabby shacks grew up thinking they “owned” the island and that the Torrey-West family were their guests and their jobs were to make them as comfortable as possible.  Talk about a “WOW” moment!  The caretakers lived on the island and kept the property up all year round and the Torrey-West family would come only in the winter to stay.  That was their way of life.

Inside a tabby shack

Inside a tabby shack

Inside a tabby shack

Inside a tabby shack

The day we were there the temperature was in the 90’s and the humidity was at least 90%!  We had, what we thought, plenty of water, bug spray, sunscreen, and our camera gear all ready to capture birds and whatever else we found down the dirt road leading to marshlands.

Tropical paradise

Tropical paradise

Palm tree

Palm tree

Instead we were limited to photographing the lush green trees and moss along the way.  We walked for about 30 minutes and Julie discovered multiple ticks crawling on her and her gear (yes we used bug spray and reapplied a couple of times). I did not see any right away.  There was a group ahead of us, who turned and came back out as well, for the same reasons.  Lots of walking not much to see and an invasion of ticks!

Spanish Moss

Spanish Moss

Hiking through Ossabaw

Hiking through Ossabaw

Once back to “civilization”, I stowed my gear on the boarding house steps and went to the clubhouse for more water.  I took my water to the boarding house and removed my shoes and socks to let my feet cool! I enjoyed the tranquility of the boarding house porch and listened to the birds singing and watch the painter in front of me work on her creation.  All of a sudden she stopped and laid her canvas down and said, “Well, that ruined my day!  A tick just landed in the middle of my painting!”  She said she could not concentrate now.  I agreed with her that definitely was a “creative killer”.  One of the painters started early.  She did not participate in the indigo talk and began painting the tabby shacks. She worked on them the entire time we were on the island.  She said she would finish it when she returned to the mainland and that she only worked outside.

Ossabaw Artist

Ossabaw Artist

Painter on Ossabaw

Painter on Ossabaw

Ossabaw artist

Ossabaw artist; she will finish her painting once returning to the mainland

The setting for the boarding house was like that out of a romance novel.  I peeped in the windows and the decor was very elegant and very southern.  Again, it would be nice to stay there a while and enjoy the peacefulness of the island…without the ticks of course.

Boarding house

Boarding house

The smokehouse was the oldest tabby structure on the island, dating back to the 1700’s.  It had been built onto several times and remained functional into the 20th century.

Smokehouse door

Smokehouse door

There is a gravel road that runs through Ossabaw.  It is the longest, active, gravel road in the United States.  It is 7 miles long.  The beginning of the road is lined with oak trees.

Road through Ossabaw

Road through Ossabaw

By the time we were ready to leave the donkeys had taken to the field to graze on grass. They gave up hope of a few snacks from the tourists!

Domesticated donkeys

Domesticated donkeys

After a long hot day on Ossabaw, the 1/4 mile walk to the dock was met with mixed feelings.  For the creatives in the bunch we learned a great history lesson about our past.  The writers in the group have plenty of imagery to work with as well as enough information to do character development about life on a tropical island.  I enjoyed hearing the stories and capturing the images. While I would have enjoyed a longer stay, the ticks ruined my excitement and the humidity exhausted me.  Would I go back?  Yes, and I would do things a little different.  I would love to participate in one of the workshops or an archeological dig.  I think that would be very interesting.

Leaving Ossabaw

Leaving Ossabaw

I can understand Sandy’s love for the island.  The solitude and pureness that exists here is something you can only experience on Ossabaw.

Tabby Shack dating from the 1700

Tabby Shack dating from the 1700’s on Ossabaw Island. My image from the Creative Tour


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Conservation Island exploration Summer Vacation Travel Bull River Cruises Captian Mike Neal Donkeys Dr. Bob Presley Eleanor Torrey-West Georgia indigo loon osprey Ossabaw Island Ossabaw Island Foundation Robin Gunn Sandy West Savannah shrimp boat Tabby Shacks https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/6/Creative-Trip-to-Ossabaw-Island-Georgia Sun, 14 Jun 2015 08:22:33 GMT
Ice and Snow 2015 https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/2/Ice-and-Snow-2015 Last year I accompanied a friend of mine to Florida for a week in January.  The temperature reached the mid 70’s and we celebrated the new year laying on the beach watching fireworks. My arrival home was more of a shock to the system. When we landed in Columbus, Ohio it was snowing and there was about 3″ on the ground already.  I seriously considered going back to Florida this year, but it wasn’t in the cards.

Instead of a trip south a couple of friends and I opted for a winter workshop, hosted by Mountaineer Photo Excursions (http://www.mountaineerphotoexcursions.com/workshops) in Oakland, Maryland and Deep Creek Lake.  We wake up our first morning to catch the sunrise on Deep Creek Lake and it is 3 degrees and 30MPH winds (which is typical).  We dressed, layer after layer of clothing and a ski suit, boots, gloves, hats that we could barely move about! We were sweating before we even left our room! The sunrise was lovely, but we soon found out that our key remotes to our cars no longer functioned and our autofocus and remote shutter releases were useless. A few of us found out the hard way that you cannot blow on your lens or LED screens to get rid of snow or any other debris…it freezes instantly!

Deepcreek sunrise

Sunrise at Deep Creek, Maryland

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Manual auger to drill a hole for fishing

After we had breakfast we, again, faced the cold blast of the lake; this time to watch the ice fishermen.  We trudged out to the closest group we could find. They used either a manual or motorized auger to drill a hole (no larger than 8″ in diameter) in the ice over the lake.

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Measuring the thickness of the ice. One fisherman told us the ice was about a foot thick beneath us…still…we were standing in the middle of a lake!  We found out later that there are many springs that feed the lake and the ice may not be as stable as we think it is!  That was comforting to know…after we had made our way back to shore!

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Snowmobile and “fish tents” dot the lake

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Fish finder camera

They are not permitted to build “fish huts” but instead they have tents.  Another fisherman showed us how he used digital technology by submerging a small camera into the water to find fish.  Inside the tent it was very comfortable; he had a kerosene heater and a chair.  Many of the fishermen pull their equipment out onto the lake on little sleds; others ride snowmobiles out.

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Fishermen make their way out to the lake

Out next stop was to the Circle R Ranch to see a horse drawn sleigh.  The ranch was Amish run and we asked if we could photograph them and they had no problem with us taking pictures of them or their ranch.  The kids had just been given a small handmade sled. It was the kind you had to balance yourself on and sit upright.  The kids had a blast riding on the sled.  They would start at the top of the driveway and go all the way to the end.  The horses were very curious and would nudge us for attention.  Just watching the sleigh coming over the hill was like the Currier & Ives Paintings I remember from the tins of cookies we received at Christmas.

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Pony at Circle R Ranch

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Horse drawn sleigh coming through the field

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Frosty ride!

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Pure joy!

After a much needed “warm-up” and a bite to eat; the group made it’s way to the Swallow Falls State Park.  The falls were partially frozen, but there was enough water flow to capture the silky cascades rolling over the rocks. The stairs down to the falls were frozen and treacherous, but we all made it down safely.  There were families hiking and the kids would sit on their bottoms and slide down the steps!  That was fun to watch, but I’m not that adventurous!

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Muddy River Falls at Swallow Falls State Park, MD

The next morning we gathered in the town of Oakland, Maryland.  The Transportation Museum graciously opened its doors for us to photograph all of the antique cars, buggies, and watercraft.  It was very interesting to see all of the old cars and various modes of transportation in one place.  The highlight of our trip was the old train station that had been completely restored.  It had all of its original woodwork and architectural finishings; the only “new” pieces were 7 panes of stained glass that had to be replaced.  The design was very unusual. Oakland, at one time, had been a very popular resort area with large exclusive hotels. While we were there a train did us the favor of passing by so we could capture the station and the train together.  I was thrilled to capture the scene, but I couldn’t help to think, “Gee, why couldn’t it had been an Norfolk Southern train?” (My dad was a Norfolk Southern employee)

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Oakland, Maryland train station

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Antique ice skates at the Transportation Museum

Do you think I had enough of the cold?  Apparently not!  This past weekend I ventured up to northern Ohio; the Cleveland area. I did have a purpose for going, though.  I had been given information on a repair shop that serviced my brand of video camera.  I chose this particular weekend because Medina, Ohio has an Ice Festival. Professional ice carvers come from all over to compete in competitions and to show off their craftsmanship.  There was already a foot of snow on the ground and it was COLD!

Friday (February 13, 2015) was the opening of the event.  They have a speed carving competition where the participants are given 20 minutes to create a finished ice sculpture.  Think about it…20 minutes to carve a sculpture out of a block of ice that is about 4′ x 1′ (estimated) and weighs over 200 pounds!  There were several pieces on display around the town square, but I wanted to see the ice carving!

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Aaron Costic carving out his design

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Aaron uses a blow torch to make it crystal clear

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Final seconds on the clock

The competitors were given 2 tools, a chain saw and a die grinder, and those were the only tools they could use for this competition.  It was fascinating to watch how they outlined their pattern with the grinder and then they started cutting out sections with the chain saw.  The would remove large sections, which later they would fuse back on to their design as horns, wings or fins, depending on what their final creation was going to be. The winner of the competition was Aaron Costic of Elegant Ice Creations in Broadview Heights, Ohio (http://www.elegantice.com). I overheard him telling someone how they add color to the sculptures.  They mix up jello and put it in the mold then seal it in with water on the back side of it.  It sets up quick when its added to ice.Mr. Costic has an impressive resume on the website.  He has been in several national (both as a participant and a judge) and world championships as a participant.  He has also participated in the Olympics; in 1998 he won a bronze medal; in 2002 he finished fourth; and in 2006 he won gold!  I had the opportunity to speak with Mr. Costic briefly before I left Medina on Sunday.  He is very soft spoken and is easy to talk to.

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Medina Historic Square is lined with ice sculptures sponsored by various businesses.

The highlight on Friday evening is the lighting of the Fire and Ice Tower.  It is about a 12′ tower of ice with an opening in the middle.  They stack the firewood in the middle of the tower and when it is lit, the fire glows beautifully through the ice.  They allow it to burn until the ice puts the fire out.

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Golden glow

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More wood is added to the fire.

After the fire had reached its final glow, I decided it was time for me to head out. I walked around snapping a few more shots and I noticed a group of people congregated together talking.  They had tripods and various camera equipment and I thought to myself, “A camera club.” I walked over and introduced myself to them and they were from the Erie Shores Photography Club. Mark Nowak, the president was talking about the event and they were deciding on a location for dinner.  He turned and asked me, “Hey, do you want to join us?”  The evening was great!  I met fellow photographers who were out doing what photographers do best…braving the weather to get the picture!  The members from Erie Shores were, Mark, Jay Allen Linder, Julie Mulheren, and Thomas Rak.  We talked about different places we enjoyed shooting and talked about the upcoming Shoot the Hills at Hocking Hills.  Their club has several members who attend the event.  I look forward to running into them this year!

Saturday morning greeted me with snow and subzero temperatures.  I did venture out to meet up with my cousins for lunch.  The drive over to Fairview Park was interesting especially on the snow covered interstate.  I made it there and back without incident!  I had a nice Valentine Day lunch with my cousins Ruth, Kenny, Bruce, and Wendy.

Sunday I made my way home…only to be greeted Monday morning with a history making snow storm in our area!  Why didn’t I go south this year?


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Travel Winter Ice ice carving Ice fishing Medina Oakland Maryland snow https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2015/2/Ice-and-Snow-2015 Mon, 16 Feb 2015 20:15:56 GMT
JAX Theatre: Hansel & Gretel: The Musical https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2014/8/JAX-Theatre-Hansel-Gretel-The-Musical We all know the Grimm’s fairy tale about Hansel and Gretel; they leave a trail of bread crumbs to find their way out of the forest, only to have the crows eat the crumbs and they stay lost, then happen on a gingerbread house owned by a witch who wants to cook them…

JAX Theatre has it’s own adaptation of this classic tale.  Jordan Nickles is the creative mind behind the characters and the song lyrics in his adaptation of Hansel and Gretel: The Musical.  If you have followed JAX over the last 4 years you have seen Jordan transform himself from a “young Scrooge” to the “elder Scrooge” for A Christmas Carol: The Musical.  For this, we need to start from the beginning.

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Jordan Nickles

In 2011 JAX Theatre had it’s first production of A Christmas Carol: The Musical.  Nickles portrayed “young Scrooge”, Marley’s ghost, and Ol’ Joe.  Marley and Ol’ Joe required extensive make-up applications and removals between scenes. Jordan designed his own make-up for the parts and applied and removed one character’s features to transform himself into another character.  Jordan brings such energy to his performances and each production is bigger than the previous.  In 2012 and 2013 JAX brought in the talent of RJ Haddy to transform Jordan into the “elder Scrooge”.  (See blog post:https://pamdecampphoto.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=101&action=edit) Other plays produced by JAX Theatre have been Steel Magnolias, Sleepy Hollow, and Alice’s Wonderland.

In 2013, not only did Haddy transform Jordan into Scrooge he applied his creativity to transform actors into Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Marley’s Ghost.

 

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Standing L to R: Christmas Past (Hannah Noel); Christmas Present (Adam Lucas); Marley’s Ghost (Ethan Lawson); Seated: Scrooge (Jordan Nickles)

 

For the JAX production of Hansel and Gretel: The Musical, RJ Haddy’s talents were called upon again to transform the lovely actress, Eva Martin, into Beatrix the Witch who lures the Hansel and Gretel into her home.

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Eva Martin before her transformation to Beatrix

Eva was thrilled with the opportunity to work with RJ.  During the time in the make-up chair Eva sat very still and RJ was amazed at her patience while he glued, sponge painted, and airbrushed her features on. The process began with Eva having her beautiful locks of hair covered with a bald cap.

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RJ & Eva during the bald cap application.

RJ applied a layer of white on Eva’s face.  He used his signature Shadow airbrush to apply the contours and fine details to give her face dimension and depth.

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JAX 49674 RJ adds contours to Eva’s face to give her character dimension and depth.

During the play the Beatrix takes on her own transformation so cracks are painted onto her “skull” and some of Eva’s own hair is pulled through the bald cap to add to the witch’s realistic appearance. After all Beatrix is 900 years old!

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Cracks are added to Beatrix’s skull

A long flowing wig was added to complete the look.

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RJ touches up around the wig so it blends with the rest of the make-up.

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RJ adding highlights to the wig.

When RJ is working he attracts on-lookers.  These are not they typical on-lookers though.  Stacey Morrison and her fiancé Jerod Walker both enjoy crafting sets and experimenting with special effects make-up.  They helped to design and build the set for Hansel and Gretel plus provided make-up design for the ballerina Petra.

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Stacey Morrison, Jerod Walker, Edward Warren watch as RJ transforms Eva into Beatrix.

Below Jerod provides his talent to bring Petra to life.

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JAX 51353 Jerod applies features to Petra (Sami Matthews)

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RJ Haddy and Beatrix (Eva Martin)

Below are scenes from Hansel and Gretel: The Musical.

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Beatrix gives Rosalinde (Baylee Martin) her opinion on Hansel and Gretel’s fate.

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The clan of witches decide the fate of Beatrix. Pictured are: Sami Matthews (Petra); Adam Lucas (Udolf); Ethan Lawson (Admiral Theodoric); Rosalinde (Baylee Martin); Bastian (Micah Simmons); Yvonne (Lana Percell); and Klaus/Felix (Jordan Nickles)

 


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pamdecampphotography@frontier.com (Pam DeCamp Photography) Broadway JAX Theatre Performing Arts Theatre #JAXtheatre @rjhaddy A Christmas Carol Beatrix D700 Eva Martin FACEOFF Hansel & Gretel Jordan Nickles Musical Nikon D700 Pam DeCamp Pam DeCamp Photography RADFX RADFXstore.com RJ Haddy Scrooge SYFY Channel theatre Wheelersburg Ohio https://www.pamdecamp.com/blog/2014/8/JAX-Theatre-Hansel-Gretel-The-Musical Mon, 18 Aug 2014 18:49:48 GMT